The History Of The Laser Printer

If you have a reliable, economical printer connected to your home or office computer, most likely it is a laser printer. You can print documents, photos, and almost any other file on your PC. In addition, these printers can be adapted for use as an integrated scanner and fax. A prototype was designed in 1969 and in 1984 was already on sale the first laser printer. Previously, the printer occurred on a small scale and sold to companies for an approximate value of $17,000.

He soon surpassed dot matrix printer and became a favorite of computer science thanks to its high quality printing and maintenance costs relatively low. In its commercial release, laser printers had an approximate value of $3,500, but since that time, prices dropped notably since the companies competed for the best market share. Minimum reached $1,000 in 1990, but three years later appeared a new and color model in United States to $12,500. Current balances are sold to a small fraction of that price but have widely enhanced capabilities. Although the first laser printers do not resemble the models that are currently sold throughout the world, the basic principle is exactly the same. Technology that uses laser printer is fairly similar in its operation to a photocopier.

The main difference is that the printer uses a laser instead of a standard bright light. The basic process of printing, electrophotography, was discovered in 1938 by Chester Carlson, an innovation ahead for the time since the companies refused to see the benefits. Laser printers are so called because they use a laser beam that projects the image of the page in a drum coated selenium which is then transferred to the paper through the toner. A simple idea which allows economic and high quality prints at home. Forty years after its invention, no longer necessary to connect laser printer to the computer, since it can be wireless, and can print the documents of all the computers that are in the Office or in the home regardless of their location. Production also rose sharply, eight pages per minute which produced the original in 1984 to 200 monochrome pages or 100 pages per minute color now. In most homes and offices in the Western world, this invention helped transform our way of working and of making prints at home.